Touch input as the future of computing

A couple of days ago Apple released a set of videos explaining the new powers of iOS 11. Here is the first one, showing you how to use the dock on an iPad:

(The other videos in the series.)

In September 2015 Tim Cook asserted: “The iPad is the clearest expression of our vision of the future of personal computing.”

I’m not sure. Here is why: this strikes me as an argument for creating, say, 3D models in VR. It’s certainly nice to be in it, but physically it’s exhausting, like standing on a ladder and doing actual sculpting work. This is what I see in these videos above. It’s nice to have this stripped down Mac interface that allows you to do more on an iPad, but I wonder if this is the future of input.

Just imagine five finger pinching every time to see the desktop instead of doing a small flick either on the touchpad or the mouse to activate a hot corner. Selecting multiple files is the same, you need to utilize both your hands, making all these movements instead of just command clicking a couple of files and dragging them. I don’t think that’s more efficient. (But then again, you could make the same argument for using the CLI in favor of the GUI.)

Again, I’m not sure, it’s just I tried to picture myself in the future of personal computing learning all these new interaction patterns and waving with both of my hands. I see it as a different kind of input (just like VR), and touch input might prevail for the masses, just like GUI did after CLI. You’ll be able to use all of them depending how you like to work. In that sense Tim Cook may just be right.

Solitude

Someone on Twitter shared this tweet. (update: had to delete embedded tweet because video was removed)

I watched it, but seemed like one of those captioned viral videos, I have no interest in watching. The premise of this man building a lush oasis somewhere in India with elephants and tigers seemed out of whack. Turns out the story is true. Jadav Payeng has devoted his life of building this forest bit by bit.

In 2012 William Douglas McMaster made a short documentary of Jadav Payeng. If you’re interested in getting to know more about this man of nature, watch it: